“Don’t Worry, Be Happy!”

“Realize that true happiness lies within you.  Waste no time and effort searching for peace and contentment and joy in the world outside.  Remember that there is no happiness in having or in getting, but only in giving.  Reach out.  Share.  Smile.  Hug.  Happiness is a perfume you cannot put on others without getting a few drops on yourself.”      Og Mandino

  

If you belong to the group of people who tend to worry a lot about anything and everything, stop right now!  You literally can worry yourself sick.

Think about it:  The majority of the things you worry about are never going to materialize, so all the energy you are putting into it is wasted energy.  Find ways to use that energy in a positive way. 

Even if a few of the many things you worry about will actually happen, there are usually circumstances out of your control, especially if they involve other people.  Instead, focus on what you have control over, and that is basically limited to yourself and your behavior.

But what do you do if you find yourself being a constant “worrier?”  Here are two practical tips:

1.  CHANGE THE WAY YOU THINK
2.  CHANGE WHAT YOU DO

In order to change the way you think, you have to change your mindset from negative to positive.  Let’s say you are worried that if you can’t meet a deadline or perform a job task, it will have an adverse effect on your performance review or your promotion prospects, or you fear you may even lose your job.  To change this negative into a positive thought, why not tell yourself this:  I have worked for this company very hard for a long time and they appreciate my effort, so things will be okay, no matter what.

If on the other hand you find yourself worrying a lot about, for example, not being able to pass a test and the reason for your worry is that you haven’t prepared yourself enough, change what you do!  Prepare yourself to the point where you can tell yourself that you have done everything in your power to pass it and feel comfortable going into the test, telling yourself that failure therefore is not an option.

Try it, it works!

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2 Comments »

  1. […] Read the rest of this great post here […]

  2. Wonder what a “worrywart” is and if you truly are one?

    The job of worry is to anticipate danger before it arises and identify possible perils, to come up with ways to lessen the risks, and to rehearse what you plan to do. Worrywarts get stuck in identifying danger as they immerse themselves in the dread associated with the threat, which may be real or, more likely, imagined. They spin out an endless loop of melodrama, blowing everything out of proportion. “What if I have a heart attack?” “What if there is an earthquake?” “What if someone breaks in when I’m asleep?”
    While worrywarts insist worrying is helpful, little is solved. Stuck in thinking ruts, they stop living in the here and now–the present moment. Worrywarting is torment–a kind of self-imposed purgatory that makes you feel bad, stresses you out, and wastes precious moments of your life.
    Worse yet, worry begets more worry, setting into motion a vicious circle of frightening thoughts and anxious response. It is self-perpetuating, pushing into greater anxiety and more worry. Allowed to continue unchecked, chronic worry can evolve into panic attacks and, in extreme cases, agoraphobia, which is a paralyzing fear of having a panic attack, especially in public. It can be so severe that, in the worst cases, the sufferer can’t leave home.
    For how to stop worrywarting and start worrying smart, visit my site.

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